Ted Kaufman - United States Senator for Delaware

Police departments celebrate $5 million in funding

Source: Delaware State News

By Logan B. Anderson

August 25, 2010

Twenty-four addition al police officers are patrolling Delaware streets thanks to the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

Nine Delaware police departments received more than $5 million to fund 24 officers through the Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) Hiring Recovery Program for three years.

Nationally, the COPS Program provided $1 billion to hire and retain police officers. Delaware had almost a third of its applications funded, beating the national average of a 14 percent funding rate.

Tuesday at Wilmington Police Department headquarters, state lawmakers and police department officials gathered to highlight how federal stimulus dollars have helped nine Delaware police departments employ 24 new police officers.

“I often say that federal investment in local law enforcement is ‘a two-fer’ — not only does it keep our families safe, it creates good-paying jobs for quality public servants at the same time,” Sen. Edward “ Ted” KAUFMAN, D-Del, said.

“But these jobs that we helped save and the new jobs created through the COPS program are not just jobs that keep unemployment numbers from rising. Our police officers are critically important members of our local communities, because the safety of our families and loved ones depends on them.”

The COPS program is not a new one. The initiative started in the mid 1990s helping departments offset the costs of hiring new police officers, the competitive grants paid for the new officer’s salary for about three years, the receiving police department had to pay the officer’s full salary for a fourth year.

Unlike previous COPS grants, where the funding was gradually reduced over the three-year commitment, the most recent round of grant awards include full funding for the three-year term.

“The grant gave us one officer and it brought our strength to 91,” Dover Police Chief James E. Hosfelt Jr. said. “This officer helps us — our complaint numbers are up. Unfortunately violent crimes are up. We are halfway through the year; hopefully that will trend out. The officer definitely helps us.”

Harrington Police Chief Norman R. Barlow, along with all the receiving police agencies, is also appreciative of the federal assistance.

“The COPS grant kept a position alive. It got our force back up to staff,” Chief Barlow said. “We really needed it.”

Like Dover, Chief Barlow said his department has been very busy, so the ability to hire an additional police officer has truly helped the southern Kent County town.

“In these tough economic times, it means so much,” Wilmington Police Chief Michael J. Szczerba said.

The Wilmington Police Department received the bulk of the grant money allotted to the First State. With the COPS program it was able to hire 16 additional police offers. The new officers recently graduated from the police academy and are already patrolling the streets.

The other police departments that benefited from the COPS program include Cheswold, Dewey Beach, Georgetown, Middletown, Selbyville and Smyrna.

Each, including Dover and Harrington, added one additional police officer.

“We are really worried about strengthening our patrol, they are our bread and butter, they are the first guys you see,” Chief Hosfelt said. “(The new officer) is in the patrol unit; he helped increase our patrol levels.”

Chief Szczerba said the program stands as a tribute to all fallen police officers and especially Georgetown Police Officer Chad Spicer, who was killed on Sept. 1, 2009.

“We are coming up on a sad year anniversary, the loss of Officer Chad Spicer who was killed in the line of duty,” Chief Szczerba said.

“It is a tribute to that officer that we continue policing and that we have the support of our federal representatives, to show the citizens of Georgetown we will always remember Officer Chad Spicer and we will go on protecting the people of Delaware.”

Sen. Thomas R. Carper, D-Del., said the unseasonably cool temperatures Tuesday in Wilmington made an already good day better for him — the day was made better because federal support put some Delawareans back to work, made the state safer and gave him the opportunity to show his appreciation for what the men and women of law enforcement do every day.

“It is a great day when we can announce that 24 new police officers have joined Delaware’s law enforcement community in helping to keep Delaware safe,” Sen. Carper said.

“Today is another example of real money from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act coming to Delaware to put people to work and help reduce crime. To these new officers and those that protect us every day, thank you for your commitment and dedication to keeping Delaware safe.”

Twenty-four addition al police officers are patrolling Delaware streets thanks to the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

 

Nine Delaware police departments received more than $5 million to fund 24 officers through the Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) Hiring Recovery Program for three years.

 

Nationally, the COPS Program provided $1 billion to hire and retain police officers. Delaware had almost a third of its applications funded, beating the national average of a 14 percent funding rate.

 

Tuesday at Wilmington Police Department headquarters, state lawmakers and police department officials gathered to highlight how federal stimulus dollars have helped nine Delaware police departments employ 24 new police officers.

 

“I often say that federal investment in local law enforcement is ‘a two-fer’ — not only does it keep our families safe, it creates good-paying jobs for quality public servants at the same time,” Sen. Edward “ Ted” KAUFMAN, D-Del, said.

 

“But these jobs that we helped save and the new jobs created through the COPS program are not just jobs that keep unemployment numbers from rising. Our police officers are critically important members of our local communities, because the safety of our families and loved ones depends on them.”

 

The COPS program is not a new one. The initiative started in the mid 1990s helping departments offset the costs of hiring new police officers, the competitive grants paid for the new officer’s salary for about three years, the receiving police department had to pay the officer’s full salary for a fourth year.

 

Unlike previous COPS grants, where the funding was gradually reduced over the three-year commitment, the most recent round of grant awards include full funding for the three-year term.

 

“The grant gave us one officer and it brought our strength to 91,” Dover Police Chief James E. Hosfelt Jr. said. “This officer helps us — our complaint numbers are up. Unfortunately violent crimes are up. We are halfway through the year; hopefully that will trend out. The officer definitely helps us.”

 

Harrington Police Chief Norman R. Barlow, along with all the receiving police agencies, is also appreciative of the federal assistance.

 

“The COPS grant kept a position alive. It got our force back up to staff,” Chief Barlow said. “We really needed it.”

 

Like Dover, Chief Barlow said his department has been very busy, so the ability to hire an additional police officer has truly helped the southern Kent County town.

 

“In these tough economic times, it means so much,” Wilmington Police Chief Michael J. Szczerba said.

 

The Wilmington Police Department received the bulk of the grant money allotted to the First State. With the COPS program it was able to hire 16 additional police offers. The new officers recently graduated from the police academy and are already patrolling the streets.

 

The other police departments that benefited from the COPS program include Cheswold, Dewey Beach, Georgetown, Middletown, Selbyville and Smyrna.

 

Each, including Dover and Harrington, added one additional police officer.

 

“We are really worried about strengthening our patrol, they are our bread and butter, they are the first guys you see,” Chief Hosfelt said. “(The new officer) is in the patrol unit; he helped increase our patrol levels.”

 

Chief Szczerba said the program stands as a tribute to all fallen police officers and especially Georgetown Police Officer Chad Spicer, who was killed on Sept. 1, 2009.

 

“We are coming up on a sad year anniversary, the loss of Officer Chad Spicer who was killed in the line of duty,” Chief Szczerba said.

 

“It is a tribute to that officer that we continue policing and that we have the support of our federal representatives, to show the citizens of Georgetown we will always remember Officer Chad Spicer and we will go on protecting the people of Delaware.”

 

Sen. Thomas R. Carper, D-Del., said the unseasonably cool temperatures Tuesday in Wilmington made an already good day better for him — the day was made better because federal support put some Delawareans back to work, made the state safer and gave him the opportunity to show his appreciation for what the men and women of law enforcement do every day.

 

“It is a great day when we can announce that 24 new police officers have joined Delaware’s law enforcement community in helping to keep Delaware safe,” Sen. Carper said.

 

“Today is another example of real money from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act coming to Delaware to put people to work and help reduce crime. To these new officers and those that protect us every day, thank you for your commitment and dedication to keeping Delaware safe.”

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